Dear Art Lover

As South Africa is entering its ninth week of lockdown and everyone is mostly disheartened and disillusioned, the creatives need your support now more than ever.

This pandemic, given its scale and unprecedented nature, has forced the galleries to shut their doors and cancel or postpone exhibitions and events. We are all feeling the austerity of the measures taken by the South African  government to curb this Covid-19 virus.But, Art is not going to die, the artists will still be inspired by current happenings and events.

Art, music, poetry, dance and literature will continue to inspire, uplift and give joy and hope. Now more than ever, art can lift our spirits, brighten our days and support our mental health.
During these challenging, and surreal times we urge you  to please support our artists ,simply because like us, you also believe in the importance of the arts.

Lwandiso Njara – God Engineering

Njara’s work is centered around the contradicts of his Catholic education in contrast with Xhosa ancestral rituals. Through his pieces, he explores an experience of identity construction, spiritual awakening and development during his boyhood years in rural Transkei. Njara’s work problematizes his negotiation between his Catholic education and his traditional upbringing. The artist treats these two polarities as binary opposites which he does not necessarily seek resolve, but use them to construct a new emergent identity. Not in any way suggesting that identities are singular and fixed, but they could possibly be perceived to be multifaceted and fragmented. He brings this investigations of his own identity in conversation with the human existence within technocratic social orders.

These post-colonial constructs of identity are explored through the use of large bronze/concrete sculptural works. Njara’s work is often unpolished and raw, exposing the internal workings of machines through tools, cogs and mechanisms. These relate to his need to deconstruct these binaries and consider each mechanisms contribution to his identity and reflect the hybrid contemporary African identity. Viewing the internal workings of these pieces also alludes to something more sinister, as he attempts to consider the use of religion in constructing a national identity.

Although Njara work conveys a personal investigation of his identity, this exploration can be applied to a collective conscious, where the diversity within South Africa is creating a hybrid third culture, and essential, separatist, understandings of identity are disappearing as our nation becomes trans-conscious.

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